My beautiful spirit name

RELAX, IT ALL WORKS OUT

Wachiwi, dancing girl

Many spirit names, especially Native American, are lovely poetic word pictures. Hiawassee means meadow; Suwanee, echo; Hehewuti, warrior mother. My spirit name is Patsy. Go ahead, laugh.

Plain old Patsy was my childhood name, before I grew up and became Pat: professional, successful, competent, yadda yadda. I reclaimed Patsy recently, inspired during a powerful presentation about Native American spirit names at a monthly women’s meeting called Moon Circle, itself a poetic word picture. When I was a child in Silicon Valley—long, long ago when it was still called Santa Clara Valley and covered with orchards and fields of mustard grass and cross-crossed by a tangle of natural creeks—I was Patsy, petite and fair-skinned, with Scandinavian-white hair. I spent my days wandering the valley with my dog Smokie, following creeks, climbing trees, walking atop fences, foot-racing unknown kids who were wandering like me. I ran faster than any boy. When…

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There

DSCF6201

There’s an old saying that a picture is worth 1,000 words.  Where the story behind the photo is memorable, valuable and has substance.  There’s story behind this photo that I didn’t put into perspective until 2 weeks after I had initially taken it.  It was taken on a solo hike around a lake that’s about 15 minute drive from me, for a quick getaway.  I saw this tree and thought, wow wouldn’t that be cool if I could walk out to the end of this tree, I bet I could get an interesting shot of the lake from there.  But upon stepping onto the tree, I found out that it was too skinny for me to have a stable balance on it and I didn’t want to risk falling in, because ya know, the cold water and the fact I was carrying my camera & phone.  I stepped back and…

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On the Darkest Hours: When you Think of Giving Up Writing

(i’m writing a bit more, just not blogging as much. I found this inspiring.)

Dar Writes

Darlene Reilley's desk Writing…or not…

On the Darkest Hours: When You Think of Giving Up Writing

The writer lows suck. Based on my experience and research, all writers get them – the dark moments when you wonder if it matters. You ask: Does anything I write make a difference? Is there a point to it all? Should I set down my pen and walk away? Shouldn’t I be doing something else? Is this really what I want?

You must choose a path.

The question leads to one of two places.

Yes, only two places.

You want to make it more complicated than this, bring in outside factors like jobs and kids and dogs and school – in the end it boils down to one of two things:

  1. Write.
  2. Don’t write.

There is no judgement here.

Either you write or you do not.

Choose the path that works for you.

Scary or no, this…

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What elephants teach us about cancer prevention

Science Chronicle

File 20170425 12640 ojvxvk Elephants express many extra genes derived from the critical tumour suppressor gene TP53. – Photo: Stephen Tan/Flickr

Joshua Schiffman, University of Utah and Lisa Abegglen, University of Utah

Every time a cell divides, there is a chance for a mutation (mistake) to occur in the DNA – the substance that carries genetic information in all living organisms. These mutations can lead to cancer. The Conversation

If all cells have a similar chance of developing cancer-causing mutations, then very large and long-lived animals with more cells undergoing more cell divisions should develop cancer at a higher rate than smaller, short-lived animals with fewer cells dividing over less time.

But in 1977, Sir Richard Peto noted thathumans develop cancer at a rate similar to mice. This is despite having 1,000 times as many cells and living 30 times as long. Another example of this phenomenon can be found in elephants. They…

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World Press Fredom Day

Brussels Diplomatic

World Press Freedom Day is marked every year on 3 May, but there is little reason to celebrate as journalists continue to be repressed and persecuted all over the world. The challenges facing the press are discussed by Parliament’s human rights subcommittee on Thursday morning, with a special focus on the growing threat of disinformation. .

The internet technologies have created new opportunities for the media, and greatest advantage in promoting democracy representing threat to authoritarian powers, resting on filtering news to manipulate public opinion.

IT technologies and social media cause the traditional mass media profound crisis in the leading democracies as the USA, where the president accuses mass media of misrepresenting his views, preferring social media, namely Twitter to communicate with the citizens.

During the debate on 4 May, members of the human rights subcommittee will discuss the World Press Freedom index compiled by Reporters without Borders as well…

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Three Poems About Marriage

literary lew

The following poem beautifully and, kind of darkly, describes the duress that marriage presents to two people who have opted to engage in the process of becoming, “one flesh.”  I like to think, facetiously, that marriage was invented by the gods just to torment mankind, forcing two diametrically opposed forces to live together under the same roof.  Traditional life has controlled the tension of this union of opposites by implementing overt power, defining the term “marriage” as a relationship in which the female would be subservient to the male.  Technically this subservience went to the extent that it deprived women of a subjective experience, that their desire should only be to please their husband. But women usually managed to get their pound of flesh in the relationship which Alfred Hitchcock beautifully and darkly portrayed in his movie “Frenzy.”  In this movie a psychopathic killer was on a rampage of grisly…

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Poulenc Couldn’t Believe What Ravel Said about Saint-Saëns

Kile Smith | composer

Camille Saint-Saëns

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday 5–6 pm on WRTI-FM… One hundred years ago, 18-year-old Francis Poulenc was looking for a composition teacher, and being recommended by the pianist Ricardo Viñes to Maurice Ravel, went to meet him, scores in hand. Ravel was already well-known, having composed much of the music for which he is famous today.

He was also part of the new breezes blowing through French music at the time of the First World War. Generations were traveling in new directions with Claude Debussy, Erik Satie, Ravel, and others, away from the German symphonic tradition and away from the 19th century. Viñes and Ravel were part of a group, in fact, that met regularly to play for each other and to discuss these very issues. “The Apaches” they called themselves, the name not only of the Native American nation, but also a French word…

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